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Book review: ‘No Easy Day: The Firsthand Account of the Mission That Killed Osama bin Laden’

  • By
  • Peter Bergen,
  • New America Foundation
August 30, 2012 |

Even before the book went on sale, the announcement by the publisher Dutton that the pseudonymous Mark Owen, one of the SEALs on the mission that killed Osama bin Laden, would be publishing an account of his role in the raid quickly propelled “No Easy Day” to the No. 1 slot on Amazon, displacing “Fifty Shades of Grey.”

Sense and Nonsense About Obama and Osama

  • By
  • Peter Bergen,
  • New America Foundation
August 29, 2012 |

On Wednesday some media outlets obtained copies of the heavily embargoed book "No Easy Day" by Mark Owen, the pseudonym of one of the Navy SEALs who was part of the mission that killed Osama bin Laden.

Practicing Balance

September 3, 2012

Work-life imbalance is a problem that has personal, national, and religious implications. Millions of Americans sense that they are rushing through life and that their work and non-work lives compete with one another.  Clergy and lay leaders are struggling with overwork.  Church members are looking for help. Practicing Balance demonstrates why congregational leaders should take work-life imbalance seriously. The issue gets in the way of spiritual development, church attendance, and member involvement.

Programs:

Alcove 4: Writing Obama

June 29, 2012
Writing about the life of the President of the United States can be a daunting task - just ask Robert Caro. The mission is even more complicated when the commander-in-chief is an esteemed author himself like President Barack Obama. But since Obama took office, a few masterful writers have successfully unearthed hidden stories from his past and present. Join the New America Foundation for a conversation with three authors who have helped reveal the real Barack Obama to the American public.
Programs:

Welcome to the Hybrid Age

  • By
  • Parag Khanna,
  • New America Foundation
  • and Ayesha Khanna
June 14, 2012 |

One 26-year-old says more than half his memories come from his online life. A Japanese man marries a voluptuous digital avatar. A corporate laboratory implants memories in 7-year-olds, convincing them they swam with dolphins. In their minds, they even got wet.

Terminal Sickness

  • By
  • Lina Khan,
  • Phillip Longman,
  • New America Foundation
March 12, 2012 |

It was certainly one of the hardest choices that I’ve ever made,” explained Fernando Aguirre. He’d raised his family and built his career in Cincinnati, Ohio, rising through the ranks of the city’s business elite, first as an executive at Procter & Gamble’s headquarters and later as CEO and chairman of Chiquita Brands International. Along the way, he became a fanatical fan and part owner of the Cincinnati Reds baseball team, as well as a proud sponsor of the Chiquita Classic golf tournament, the proceeds from which he poured into local philanthropies.

Big California, Little Fixes

  • By
  • Joe Mathews,
  • New America Foundation
January 27, 2012 |

We are told that in California politics and government, 2012 is shaping up as a very big year. That there will be — says Gov. Jerry Brown as he channels the philosopher Thomas Hobbes — "a war of all against all." That parties and interest groups are headed to the ballot with initiatives to gore one another's oxen. That we are about to decide the big questions of taxes and budgets and schools and maybe pensions.

Nonsense.

Islam and the West Through the Eyes of Two Women

  • By
  • Eliza Griswold,
  • New America Foundation
January 27, 2012 |

Very few of the heroes and villains made famous in the wars of the past decade are women. Of the scant exceptions, two of the most fascinating are the subjects of Deborah Scroggins’s thoughtful double biography, “Wanted Women.”

One is Ayaan Hirsi Ali, the Somali-born thinker and neoconservative darling; the other is Aafia Siddiqui, a Pakistani neuroscientist who, in 2010, was sentenced to 86 years in prison for her assault on American personnel in Afghanistan. She is known as Al Qaeda’s highest-ranking female associate.

Programs:

The Haitian Migration

  • By
  • Charles Kenny,
  • New America Foundation
January 9, 2012 |

As we approach the second anniversary of the devastating Haiti earthquake, which killed around 150,000 people and destroyed much of Port-au-Prince, there has been mixed progress.  About half of the rubble has been cleared (if that sounds slow, consider it took five years to remove far less rubble in Aceh after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami). About half a million people are still living in camps in Haiti -- but that is down from closer to 1.5 million two years ago. Meanwhile cholera, introduced by U.N.

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